Friday, October 24, 2014

Liz Is Recommending:
John Grisham has a new hero . . . and she’s full of surprises

The year is 2008 and Samantha Kofer’s career at a huge Wall Street law firm is on the fast track—until the recession hits and she gets downsized, furloughed, escorted out of the building. Samantha, though, is one of the “lucky” associates. She’s offered an opportunity to work at a legal aid clinic for one year without pay, after which there would be a slim chance that she’d get her old job back.

In a matter of days Samantha moves from Manhattan to Brady, Virginia, population 2,200, in the heart of Appalachia, a part of the world she has only read about. Mattie Wyatt, lifelong Brady resident and head of the town’s legal aid clinic, is there to teach her how to “help real people with real problems.” For the first time in her career, Samantha prepares a lawsuit, sees the inside of an actual courtroom, gets scolded by a judge, and receives threats from locals who aren’t so thrilled to have a big-city lawyer in town. And she learns that Brady, like most small towns, harbors some big secrets.

Her new job takes Samantha into the murky and dangerous world of coal mining, where laws are often broken, rules are ignored, regulations are flouted, communities are divided, and the land itself is under attack from Big Coal. Violence is always just around the corner, and within weeks Samantha finds herself engulfed in litigation that turns deadly.
National Geographic: The Covers is the definitive cover collection from the world's most beloved magazine. The magazine with the famous yellow border has been in publication for more than 125 years, and its vast array of cover stories have opened our eyes to a richly diverse world and taken us to places we only dream of visiting: deep within the rain forest, miles below the surface of the ocean, and into the farthest reaches of the universe. Captured by some of history's most gifted and innovative photographers, these covers tell a fascinating story of the last 125 years, one in which air power has advanced from the Wright Brothers to the Space Age; undersea exploration has evolved from awkward submersibles to sleek subs that can penetrate the ocean's deepest trench, and the natural world has transformed from a vast territory of exploitable resources into one in need of our protection. The Covers also reveals the captivating stories behind unforgettable images; from the piercing green eyes of the Afghan girl to the haunted, hunted gorillas of the Congo's Virunga Crater. Decade by decade, the covers chart our evolving understanding of global culture and the unfolding of international political events as they record groundbreaking discoveries and the enduring beauty of our natural world.
"A billion husbands are about to be replaced."

From the author of Fight Club, the classic portrait of the damaged contemporary male psyche, now comes this novel about the apocalyptic marketing possibilities of female pleasure. Sisters will be doing it for themselves. And doing it. And doing it. And doing it some more . . . 
Penny Harrigan is a low-level associate in a big Manhattan law firm with an apartment in Queens and no love life at all. So it comes as a great shock when she finds herself invited to dinner by one C. Linus Maxwell, aka "Climax-Well," a software mega-billionaire and lover of the most gorgeous and accomplished women on earth. After dining at Manhattan's most exclusive restaurant, he whisks Penny off to a hotel suite in Paris, where he proceeds, notebook in hand, to bring her to previously undreamed-of heights of orgasmic pleasure for days on end. 
What's not to like? This: Penny discovers that she is a test subject for the final development of a line of sex toys to be marketed in a nationwide chain of boutiques called "Beautiful You". So potent and effective are these devices that women by the millions line up outside the stores on opening day and then lock themselves in their room with them and stop coming out. Except for batteries. Maxwell's plan for erotically enabled world domination must be stopped. But how?

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