Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Liz Is Recommending:
Princeton University, 1980. A young and unambitious librarian named Anna Roth is assigned the task of retrieving the records of Kurt Gödel--the most fascinating and hermetic mathematician of the 20th century. Her mission consists of befriending and ultimately taming the great man's widow, Adele, a notoriously bitter woman set on taking belated revenge against the establishment by refusing to hand over these documents of immeasurable historical value.

But as Anna soon finds out, Adele has a story of her own to tell. Through descriptions of Princeton and Vienna after the war, the occupation of Austria by the Nazis, the pressures of McCarthyism, the end of the positivist ideal, and the advent of nuclear weapons, Anna discovers firsthand the epic story of a genius who could never quite find his place in the world, and the private torment of the woman who loved him.
The former chief political correspondent for The New York Times Magazine brilliantly revisits the Gary Hart affair and looks at how it changed forever the intersection of American media and politics.

In 1987, Gary Hart-articulate, dashing, refreshingly progressive-seemed a shoo-in for the Democratic nomination for president and led George H. W. Bush comfortably in the polls. And then: rumors of marital infidelity, an indelible photo of Hart and a model snapped near a fatefully named yacht (Monkey Business), and it all came crashing down in a blaze of flashbulbs, the birth of 24-hour news cycles, tabloid speculation, and late-night farce. 
Matt Bai shows how the Hart affair marked a crucial turning point in the ethos of political media-and, by extension, politics itself-when candidates' "character" began to draw more fixation than their political experience. Bai offers a poignant, highly original, and news-making reappraisal of Hart's fall from grace (and overlooked political legacy) as he makes the compelling case that this was the moment when the paradigm shifted-private lives became public, news became entertainment, and politics became the stuff of Page Six.
It's an age-old battle: cat vs. dog
Now, National Geographic and BuzzFeed's Jack Shepherd team up to settle the dispute once and for all! Documenting cats' superior abilities in such areas as artistry, athleticism, and intellect, Shepherd provides compelling insight into the fight for pet dominance. 
Perfectly pairing witty text with hilarious photographs and hard-hitting scientific facts, this brutally honest book culls the best evidence of the supremacy of cats (that the Internet can provide) to establish with definitive proof that individuals of the feline persuasion reign supreme over their canine counterparts.
The secrets to Italian cooking, straight from the source—the wildly popular food emporium that is founded in Italy.

"The more you know, the more you will enjoy" is the philosophy behind Eataly, and it is the idea behind this essential compendium of Italian cooking. Here, Eataly’s team of experts, including Mario Batali and Lidia Bastianich, covers everything you need to know about Italian food, starting from the ground up. Learn how to assemble an antipasto platter, how to eat breakfast like an Italian, and how to use pantry flavor boosters like capers and anchovies. 
The first secret to the best cooking, of course, is the best-quality ingredients. How to Eataly tells you what to look for in the market, then offers one hundred recipes for contemporary classics such as Acorn Squash with Lentils, Vesuvio Pasta with Sausage, and Panna Cotta with Streusel. In addition, the book is packed with simple ideas for what to do with staples, from olive oil to mozzarella. 
Whether you are cooking from scratch or using some store-bought components, How to Eataly empowers you to create delicious meals by fostering a total understanding of Italian cooking.

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