Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Wendy Is Recommending:
From the acclaimed author of the "ripping good" (The New York Times) debut novel Three Graves Full comes a new thriller about a woman who digs into her unconventional past to confirm what she suspects: her husband isn't what she thought he was.

Dee Aldrich rebelled against her off-center upbringing when she married the most conventional man she could imagine: Patrick, her college sweetheart. But now, years later, her marriage is falling apart and she's starting to believe that her husband has his eye on a new life...a life without her, one way or another.

Haunted by memories of her late mother Annette, a former covert operations asset, Dee reaches back into her childhood to resurrect her mother's lessons and the "spy games" they played together, in which Dee learned memory tricks and, most importantly, how and when to lie. But just as she begins determining the course of the future, she makes a discovery that will change her life: her mother left her a lot of money and her own husband seems to know more about it than Dee does. Now, before it's too late, she must investigate her suspicions and untangle conspiracy from coincidence, using her mother's advice to steer her through the blind spots. The trick, in the end, will be in deciding if a "normal life" is really what she wants at all.

With pulse-pounding prose and atmospheric settings, Monday's Lie is a thriller that delivers more of the "Hitchcockian menace" (Peter Straub) that made Three Graves Full a critical hit. For fans of the Coen brothers or Gillian Flynn, this is a book you won't want to miss.
Dr. Alex Schiller doles out dating advice in this new sex and dating guide that’s hilarious and profoundly wise in equal parts.

Dr. Alex Schiller* has been headlining a popular comedy show and singles event called "Never Sleep Alone" in New York City for the past two years, where her mission is to help singles everywhere overcome their awkwardness, make "connections without expectations," and fulfill their sexual destinies. Now, the celebrated socio-sexual psychologist doles out advice on sex and dating through her signature blend of outrageous satirical humor and genuine wisdom in her new sex and dating guide, Never Sleep Alone.

With her compulsively quotable pearls of wisdom, such as "no amount of physics can alter chemistry," "don’t stay in and see the movie—go out and BE the movie," "seducing the room is the easiest way to seduce the one," "the more you talk, the less he listens," and "desire is contagious," Dr. Alex empowers us to laugh at ourselves, to overcome inhibitions, and, most importantly, to Never Sleep Alone.

*Dr. Alex is not a real doctor
A breakout book from Stephen Marche, The Hunger of the Wolf is a novel about the way we live now: a sweeping, genre-busting tale of money, morality, and the American Dream--and the men and monsters who profit in its pursuit--set in New York, London, and the Canadian wilderness.

"Hunters found his body naked in the snow." 

So begins this breakout book from Stephen Marche, the provocative Esquire columnist and regular contributor to The Atlantic, whose last work of fiction was described by the New York Times Book Review as "maybe the most exciting mash-up of literary genres since David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas."

The body in the snow is that of Ben Wylie, the heir to America's second-wealthiest business dynasty, and it is found in a remote patch of northern Canada. Far away, in post-crash New York, Jamie Cabot, the son of the Wylie family's housekeepers, must figure out how and why Ben died. He knows the answer lies in the tortured history of the Wylie family, who over three generations built up their massive holdings into several billion dollars' worth of real estate, oil, and information systems despite a terrible family secret they must keep from the world. The threads of the Wylie men's destinies, both financial and supernatural, lead twistingly but inevitably to the naked body in the snow and a final, chilling revelation.

The Hunger of the Wolf is a novel about what it means to be a man in the world of money. It is a story of fathers and sons, about secrets that are kept within families, and about the cost of the tension between the public face and the private soul. Spanning from the mills of Depression-era Pittsburgh to the Swinging London of the 1960s, from desolate Alberta to the factories of present-day China, it is a bold and breathtakingly ambitious work of fiction that uses the story of a single family to capture the way we live now.

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