Saturday, May 31, 2014

Eric Is Recommending:
Exams, all-nighters, and crazy roommates can add up to a lot of stress for college students. Now the collegiate set can let off a little steam by indulging in the comfort of a childhood favorite: an activity book packed full of coloring pages, connect-the-dots, paper doll cut outs, word searches, mazes and more—with a healthy dose of caustic wit and grown-up themes.

Readers will find witty activities such as:
*Degrees of Success! Match your degree of choice (Philosophy, Art History, Communications, Journalism) to the job it will actually land you in the real world: Substitute teacher, sandwich artist, production assistant, freelance video blogger, street performer, etc...
*What’s Behind that Door? There’s a sock on the dorm room door, draw the important reason your roommate needed the room to himself tonight!
*Orientation BINGO!

With more than 50 activities, the Coloring for Grown-Ups College Companion is the perfect back-to-school gift for everyone from incoming freshmen to recent grads.
A hilarious pictorial parody of a clueless father and his adorable daughter

In an attempt to create an image that his new daughter would one day appreciate, Dave Engledow took a photo in which he’s cradling eight-week-old Alice Bee like a football and doctored it to look like he’s squirting breast milk into a "World’s Best Father" mug. Friends and family clamored for more. After Dave’s humorous attempts to capture the sleep-deprived obliviousness of being a first-time dad went viral, he and Alice Bee found themselves bona fide Internet and television celebrities.

Merging a Norman Rockwell aesthetic with a darkly comic sensibility, Dave pairs each side-splittingly funny image with a log entry describing the awkward situation that the World’s Best Father has found himself in. Readers of Sh*t My Dad Says and Awkward Family Photos will devour the artful and hilarious Confessions of the World’s Best Father.

A love story set in 1845 Nantucket, between a female astronomer and the unusual man who understands her dreams.

It is 1845, and Hannah Gardner Price has lived all twenty-four years of her life according to the principles of the Nantucket Quaker community in which she was raised, where simplicity and restraint are valued above all, and a woman’s path is expected to lead to marriage and motherhood. But up on the rooftop each night, Hannah pursues a very different—and elusive—goal: discovering a comet and thereby winning a gold medal awarded by the King of Denmark, something unheard of for a woman.

And then she meets Isaac Martin, a young, dark-skinned whaler from the Azores who, like herself, has ambitions beyond his expected station in life. Drawn to his intellectual curiosity and honest manner, Hannah agrees to take Isaac on as a student. But when their shared interest in the stars develops into something deeper, Hannah’s standing in the community begins to unravel, challenging her most fundamental beliefs about work and love, and ultimately changing the course of her life forever.

Inspired by the work of Maria Mitchell, the first professional female astronomer in America, The Movement of Stars is a richly drawn portrait of desire and ambition in the face of adversity. 

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